@NARNiHS Twitter Feed

Latest tweets from NARNiHS!

Still a few days left to submit your new explorations in #historicalsociolinguistics to the all-online 4th Annual Meeting of the North American Research Network in Historical Sociolinguistics (#NARNiHS), 7-11 Jan 2022. Call for papers: https://narnihs.org/?page_id=1728. Deadline: 9/27

#NARNiHS is excited to partner with Studies in the History of the English Language (SHEL) for sessions on the #historicalsociolinguistics of English at SHEL-12, 19-21 May 2022, Univ of Washington, Seattle. Call for Papers: https://depts.washington.edu/shel12/cfp/ Abstract deadline: 01 Nov 2021.

Interested in the @NWAV49 program in October? Don't miss our special #NARNiHS session on historical sociolinguistics for exciting new approaches to language variation in historical materials! Details here: https://narnihs.org/?page_id=1751 #historicalsociolinguistics

A mid-summer reminder of the CfP for the all-online 4th Annual Meeting of the North American Research Network in Historical Sociolinguistics (#NARNiHS), 7-11 Jan 2022: https://narnihs.org/?page_id=1728. Share your your new explorations in #historicalsociolinguistics with us! Deadline: 9/27

It's here! The CfP for the all-online 4th Annual Meeting of the North American Research Network in Historical Sociolinguistics (#NARNiHS), 7-11 Jan 2022: https://narnihs.org/?page_id=1728. Send us your abstracts with your new explorations in #historicalsociolinguistics. Deadline: Sept 27!

... and another successful #NARNiHS Research Incubator came to an end today with a vibrant discussion of theory, methods and data in #historicalsociolinguistics. Many thanks to our presenters and audience! And stay tuned for more NARNiHS events at https://narnihs.org/

Not all purisms are created equal, says Jennifer Manoukian (UCLA) at her presentation on historical forms of purism in the standardization of Ottoman Armenian varieties at Saturday's #NARNiHS panel! #historicalsociolinguistics

The ancient Mesoamerican stelae spoke again as David Mora Marín (U of N Carolina at Chapel Hill) walked us through his latest data on syllabogram variation in Classic Maya epigraphy at Saturday’s #NARNiHS panel. #historicalsociolinguistics

What´s in an <s>? A lot, according to Mark Iten (U de Lausanne) and his research on long and short <s> in 18th-cent. English pauper petitions on Saturday's #NARNiHS Research Incubator panel! #historicalsociolinguistics

Seasons come and go, and so do words... but why? We got all the answers from Karlien Franco (Katholieke U Leuven) and her research on historical lexical replacement rates at Friday's #NARNiHS Research Incubator panel. #historicalsociolinguistics

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